500 Questions: Tough Questions, Part 10

Can I have your Social Security number?

This is an illegal question and may not be asked by an interviewer or prospective employer. Once you have accepted employment, you will have to provide your social security number, but not before.

You have an accent. Where are you from?

This may be an illegal question and may not be asked by an interviewer or prospective employer. This question could easily lead to discrimination, which is against the law. Re-assure the employer, however, that you have a right to work in the United States. Be prepared to show proof of citizenship or a work permit if necessary.

Have you ever worked under a different name?

This question, although legal, may be used by interviewers to determine if you have been married. You do not need to offer specifics. Answer carefully and remember that any question about your maiden name or heritage could easily lead to discrimination, which is against the law.

What does your spouse do?

It is unnecessary for a prospective employer to learn about your spouse. However, the question may be asked only out of innocent curiosity. It is best to get back to the subject of your qualifications.

Are you planning on having children someday?

This is an illegal question and may not be asked by an interviewer or prospective employer. Any question about children could easily lead to discrimination, which is against the law. Reassure the interviewer that your family life has never affected your job performance in the past.

Do you have an arrest record?

Unless you have been convicted of a felony, your do not have to answer this question. Keep your response as short as possible.

Do you live with your parents?

Living with parents implies over-reliance on them and a lack of initiative and self-confidence. If you are living with your parents, you might indicate that you are currently looking for your own apartment, if this is the case.